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A House, full of Stories

Datum
27 June 2016 until 27 June 2030

Museum Our Lord in the Attic is a house full of stories. Visitors can enjoy these stories with free audio guides. There are audio tours available in Dutch, English, French, German, Spanish, Italian and Russian Language.

The church in the attic tells us the stories of 19th century Amsterdam and in the house you can here a lot of stories about the 17th century. In the entrance building (the 'new house'), the central theme of the museum 'tolerance' is connected to our day and age. Thoughts, experiences and visions about tolerance are shared in the new audio guide 'Inspired by Tolerance'.   

Of course the museum offers a special audio guide for children. Feast! tells you all you want to know and more about the Holidays in The Netherlands, such as Easter, Pentecost, Ascension and Christmas. 

CoVisit
The entrance building of the museum has a lift, the original house and church unfortunately not. However, for people with walking difficulties the museum offers the Co-Visit, a ‘virtual tour’ of the building, together with their companion. This interactive tour enables the visitor to share the visit of his walking companion in the museum, and by means of a mobile device they can stay in contact during the whole visit. For more information about accessibility and CoVisit, please contact info@opsolder.nl

Audio guides and Co-Visit are included in the entrance fee.

Reconstruction
The last couple of years the church has been entirely refurbished. While until recently, cupboards were converted into showcases to display art, now the process is reversed: the showcases have been removed and the cupboards are once again cupboards. The idea was to restore the church’s original function and this was the guideline for the restoration. Visitors can now experience the building as it was when it served as a parish church. Colour, light and interior exude the atmosphere of the period in which the last regular masses were celebrated at the church, in the late 19th century.